High trait shame undermines the protective effects of prevalence knowledge on state shame following HPV/CIN diagnosis in women.

TitleHigh trait shame undermines the protective effects of prevalence knowledge on state shame following HPV/CIN diagnosis in women.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2017
JournalJournal of behavioral medicine
Volume40
Issue5
Pagination814-820
ISSN0160-7715
Abstract

Human papillomavirus (HPV), and the related, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), are common yet poorly understood physical conditions. The diagnosis of HPV often elicits shame and guilt, which in turn may undermine psychological and physical health. The current study compared shame and guilt responses to diagnosis among two groups: women diagnosed with HPV/CIN and women diagnosed with Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV/IM). Eighty women recently diagnosed with HPV/CIN or EBV/IM completed measures of shame- and guilt-proneness, shame and guilt following diagnosis, and disease knowledge including prevalence estimates (HPV and EBV, respectively). HPV/CIN (vs. EBV/IM) predicted more diagnosis-related shame and guilt. Estimates of high prevalence interacted with diagnosis and shame-proneness to predict diagnosis-related shame. Simple slope analyses indicated that in women with HPV/CIN reporting low-to-average shame-proneness, high prevalence estimates reduced diagnosis-related shame; however, women high in shame-proneness experienced high diagnosis-related shame regardless of more accurate prevalence estimates. Women high in shame-proneness appear to be particularly vulnerable to HPV-related shame even when they are aware that it is very common.

URLhttps://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10865-017-9849-8
DOI10.1007/s10865-017-9849-8
Short TitleJ Behav Med
X
Enter your linkblue username.
Enter your linkblue password.
Secure Login

This login is SSL protected

Loading