Opiate receptor ontogeny and morphine-induced effects: influence of chronic footshock stress in preweanling rats.

TitleOpiate receptor ontogeny and morphine-induced effects: influence of chronic footshock stress in preweanling rats.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication1981
JournalBrain research
Volume227
Issue4
Pagination487-95
ISSN0006-8993
Abstract

The ontogeny of opiate receptors was examined in various CNS regions of preweanling rats which received either daily inescapable footshock stress, exposure to a footshock apparatus without shock, or no handling from birth to 21 days of age. At 21 days of age, each of these treatment groups was also assessed for morphine-induced changes in activity, hot-plate paw-lick latency, and core body temperature. Marked regional differences in [3H]naloxone binding capacity were observed from 7 to 21 days of age in spinal cord, medulla-pons, midbrain, hypothalamus, striatum, and cortex. Caudal regions approached adult-like [3H]naloxone binding before rostral regions. The normal ontogeny of opiate receptors was not significantly influenced by the chronic footshock treatment. However, footshock treatment significantly reduced the efficacy of morphine (2 mg/kg) in producing hypoactive and antinociceptive effects, but not in producing a hyperthermic effect. These results demonstrate that stress-related changes in the behavioral efficacy of morphine do not necessarily depend upon changes in those opiate receptor populations that bind naloxone.

Short TitleBrain Res
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