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chemistry

Butterfield on Mentoring and Why it Matters

The beginning of the new year marks a celebration of mentoring at the National Science Foundation through the recognition of mentors via PAESMEM: the Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics, & Engineering Mentoring.  A recent article published by the National Science Foundation featured PAESMEM alumni, including Chemistry Professor D. Allan Butterfield, on the subject of what makes a good mentor and why mentoring matters.

Bio-inspired Materials for Carbon Capture and Self-Improvement

Nature uses microvascular structures as a central element of complex materials that grow, regenerate, and improve themselves and their function. Work into synthesizing microvascular materials has recently taken a step forward in the form of a new synthetic process VaSC (Vaporization of a Sacrificial Component) that enables the formation of 3D microstructures that are meters in length. I report on our recent advances in using VaSC to create three-dimensional gas exchange units modeled on the design of avian lungs. I will focus on mass transfer applications for the capture of CO2. I will also report on recent research into creating high surface area micro-structures, the synthesis of cooperative binders of CO2 and chemical reactions mediated by photo-thermal effects. Finally, I will talk about adapting microvascular structure to allow them to improve their functions through chemical remodeling.

Link to Esser-Kahn group: link

Date:
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Location:
CP-114B
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The Design, Synthesis, and Characterization of Electron-Donating Phenothiazines for Electrochemical Energy Storage Applications

"Electron-Donating Phenothiazines for Energy Storage Applications"

Prof. Susan A. Odom

Department of Chemistry, University of Kentucky

Phenothiazine derivatives have seen widespread use as stable electron-donating organic compounds with generally stable oxidized states, which makes them an attractive core for functionalization for use in electrochemical energy storage applications. With phenothiazine itself as a starting material, functionalization of the 3, 7, and 10 positions is facile, providing options to modify redox potentials and improve stability in both the neutral and singly oxidized (radical cation) states. Additionally, this ring system can be built from aryl amines and aryl bromides, allowing for the production of compounds with even more functionalization, including incorporating groups at the 1 and 9 positions and – in some cases – at every sp2-hybridized C atom in the aromatic core. In many cases, computational studies have predicted what we have observed experimentally, and often guides our design of next-generation materials. This presentation focuses on the characterization of phenothiazine derivatives, both from experimental and computational approaches, and includes results from their incorporation into lithium-ion batteries as electrolyte additives for overcharge protection as well as studies toward using them in non-aqueous redox flow batteries as catholytes. 

This seminar is part of the 2015-16 Energy Storage Seminar Series at UK supported by NSF EPSCoR under Award No. 1355438.

Date:
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Location:
112 Oliver H Raymond Building
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Energy Storage Seminar

"Unique Electrochemical and Optical Properties of Metal Nanoparticle Assemblies"

Prof. Francis Zamborini, University of Louisville, Department of Chemistry 

http://louisville.edu/chemistry/directory/faculty/zamborini

Thursday, November 5th, 4 pm

Room 203,  Erikson Hall (directions: http://ukcc.uky.edu/cgi-bin/dynamo?maps.391+campus+0050)

host: Prof. Doo Young Kim

This seminar is funded by NSF EPSCoR award 1355438.

Date:
-
Location:
Erikson Hall Room 203
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