podcast

New Faculty 2014: Meet Jessica Burris

The Department of Psychology is excited to welcome Assistant Professor Jessica Burris to its faculty! This podcast is part of a series highlighting the new faculty members who joined the College of Arts and Sciences in the fall 2014 semester.

This podcast was produced by David Cole.

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New Faculty 2014: Meet Derek Young by UK College of Arts & Sciences is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Get Your Passport Ready: Jan Fernheimer & Paul Chamberlin Introduce the Year of the Middle East

The University of Kentucky's Passport to the World series is entering its fifth year and with that anniversary comes a number of exciting announcements. This upcoming year the program will highlight an entire region - the Middle East.

Professors Janice Fernheimer and Paul Chamberlin are at the helm of The Year of the Middle East, which begins in the Fall 2014 semester, and they have ambitious plans for the program over its yearlong duration. The professors sat down with us to discuss some of those plans and to enlighten us a bit on the culture of the Middle East.

This podcast was produced by David Cole.

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Arabian Nights: Professors on the Year of the Middle East by UK College of Arts & Sciences is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Experimenting in Psychology: Loretta Williams

University of Kentucky alumni make names for themselves all across the world. Loretta Williams is now employed at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, which has been consistently ranked the number one cancer care hospital by U.S. News & World Report. Dr. Williams believes in making the most of the opportunities presented to you, and credits taking a chance on an experimental psych course at UK with teaching her this lesson. In this podcast, Dr. Williams discusses her time in Lexington before and during her study at UK, the psych course that put her on the path to where she is now, and the importance of taking advantage of those opportunities.
 
This podcast was produced by David Cole and recorded by Laura Sutton.
 

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Experimenting in Psychology: Loretta Williams by UK College of Arts & Sciences is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Decoding Disasters: the Psychology of Calamity with Melody Carswell

Chernobyl, the Deepwater Horizon, the Titanic... each name is associated with disaster - and human error - and UK psychologist Melody Carswell wants to examine each accident from a unique investigative perspective. In her class, A&S 300-003, "Disaster: The Human Factor," students will learn how principles of cognitive psychology can be used to identify and reduce both extraordinary and everyday errors. 

This podcast was produced by Cheyenne Hohman.

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Decoding Disasters: the Psychology of Calamity with Melody Carswell by Cheyenne Hohman is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

A Trek Through the Italian Renaissance: Bailey Ubellacker

Studying abroad is considered an unforgettable experience for many of the University of Kentucky’s students. A typical study abroad program transports a group of students to a foreign country. These opportunities offer new perspectives, connections, and fond memories. The Zolondek Scholarship sets itself apart by offering students the opportunity to travel abroad on their own. 

During the summer of 2013, Bailey Ubellacker, a double major of Spanish and Elementary Education, spent three weeks abroad studying and experiencing the Italian Renaissance. Bailey Ubellacker was the recipient of the Zolondek Scholarship, which allowed her to challenge herself as she traveled alone and shaped her own study abroad experience. In this podcast, Bailey Ubellacker discusses her time in Italy and what she has brought back with her. 

This podcast was produced by Casey Hibbard.

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

A Wildcat in the Grand Canyon State: Chris McDaniel

 

The Big Blue Nation spans across more than just the Bluegrass. Chris McDaniel, who graduated from UK with a Psychology degree in 1997, resides in Scottsdale, Arizona, and heads up the UK Alumni Club there. He is a chiropractor, writer and filmmaker, among other things. In this podcast, he shares some fond UK memories, talks about his creative and professional endeavors, and gives some advice to current students. This interview was conducted by Laura Sutton.

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

The Origins of Religious Disbelief: Will Gervais

According to recent research, approximately one in five Americans don’t identify with a religion. Will Gervais, an assistant professor in the Department of Psychology, studies the origins of atheism, and is a recent addition to UK's faculty. In January 2013, he co-authored an article, "The Origins of Religious Disbelief," in the journal, Trends in cognitive sciences. Co-written with Ara Norenzayan from the University of British Columbia, the article defines four different types of atheism and their origins. 

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Opening New Doors: Debdas Mukerjee

University of Kentucky alumni Debdas Mukerjee graduated in 1962 with his Ph.D. in genetics. After UK, Mukerjee contributed his expertise to the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center before his career finally carried him to the Environmental Protection Agency where he was a Senior Environmental Health Scientist for the United States. 

All of this was not Mukerjee's plan but he found that both the University of Kentucky and the state itself opened the doors of America to him in way he would never have imagined. In this podcast, Mukerjee reminisces on his "innumerable" memories at UK and gives some advice to current students so that they too can get the most from their academic experience. 
 

This podcast was produced by Patrick O'Dowd.

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

The Meaning of Life: Will Gervais

During the 2013 fall semester, University of Kentucky students will have the opportunity to delve into questions that explore some of society's most deeply held beliefs. The ambitiously titled class, "A&S 300: The Meaning of Life - Psychology, Evolution, Religion, and Morality," will be led by Psychology Professor Will Gervais who has focused his research around this very topic.

In the class, students can expect to investigate the psychological and evolutionary underpinnings of religious and moral beliefs through studies of cognitive and evolutionary science. Gervais hopes to use this lens to encourage students to not ask questions around whether or not a higher power exists, but instead question why people believe what they do and the implications of that on society.
 
In this podcast, Gervais touches on these issues and how now more than ever, it's important that we use the tools of science to examine the roles of religion and morality.
 

This podcast was produced by Patrick O'Dowd.

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Technology on Students' Terms: Jonathan Golding

Technology in the classroom is often discussed in terms of solving issues of scale—the rise of massively open online courses just being the largest of examples. Perhaps though, technology may serve the most good when it's scaled to student needs.

Psychology Professor Jonathan Golding has found this to be the case in the many classes he teaches. As he has increasing experimented with tools like Facebook and blogs, Golding has found that the most gains come in the small interactions between students, where they learn to deal with themselves on their own terms, as real individuals. The result: a more productive learning environment made more intimate—not less—by the latest technology. 
 
In this podcast, Professor Golding discusses how he uses modern social media platforms like Facebook to change the way his students interact with him and each other while also noting some of the tensions that exist when incorporating technology into the classroom.
 

This podcast was produced by Patrick O'Dowd.

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

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