geography

PATH EXTINCTION & REINFORCEMENT

The development and change over time (evolution) of geomorphic, soil, hydrological, and ecosystems (Earth surface systems; ESS) is often, perhaps mostly, characterized by multiple potential developmental trajectories. That is, rather than an inevitable monotonic progression toward a single stable state or climax or mature form, often there exist multiple stable states or potentially unstable outcomes, and multiple possible developmental pathways. Until late in the 20th century, basic tenets of geosciences, ecology, and pedology emphasized single-path, single-outcome conceptual models such as classical vegetation succession; development of mature, climax, or zonal soils; or attainment of steady-state or some other form of stable equilibrium. As evidence accumulated of ESS evolution with, e.g., nonequilibrium dynamics, alternative stable states, divergent evolution, and path dependency, the "headline" was the existence of > 2 potential pathways, contesting and contrasting with the single-path frameworks. Now it is appropriate to address the question of why the number of actually observed pathways is relatively small.The purpose of this post is to explore why some developmental sequences are rare vs. common; why some are non-recurring (path extinction), and some are reinforced.

THE GEOMORPHOLOGICAL NICHE OF TREES

In a 2009 article I introduced the concept of a geomorphological niche, defined as the resources available to drive or support a particular geomorphic process (the concept has not caught on). The niche is defined in terms of a landscape evolution space (LES), given by

where H is height above a base level, rho is the density of the geological parent material, g is the gravity constant, and A is surface area. The k’s are factors representing the inputs of solar energy and precipitation, and Pgrepresents the geomorphically significant proportion of biological productivity (see this for the  background and justification).

BREAKAGE VS. UPROOTING & HILLSLOPE GEOMORPHOLOGY

Just published in Geomorphology:

Samonil, P., Danek, P., Adam, D., Phillips, J.D. 2017. Breakage or uprooting: how tree death affects hillslope processes in old-growth temperate forestsGeomorphology 299: 276-284. 

The abstract is below:

Posted 14 November 2017

 

Introduction to New Maps Plus

Why New Maps Plus?

The New Maps Plus graduate programs at the University of Kentucky offer students a challenging, intensive, digital mapping curriculum that emphasizes the acquisition of technical skills—coding, GIS, web development—while also preparing students to critically address the complexity of today’s information ecosystem.

Read more about how New Maps Plus is unique: newmapsplus.uky.edu/all-about

Eighth Summer Institute in Economic Geography Held at UK

The University of Kentucky College of Arts and Scienceslast week hosted the Summer Institute in Economic Geography. With a 10-year history in supporting economic geography, the college and its Department of Geography welcomed young scholars from across the globe to Lexington. This is the first time the institute has returned to the U.S. since 2006 when it was hosted by the University of Wisconsin at Madison.

 

Tags:

Jennifer Hyndman - Refugees on the Edge: 'Distant Suffering' or Domesticated Distance?

 

 

Part of the 44th Annual Ellen Churchill Semple Day

Aprill 22, 2016 Department of Geography College of Arts & Sciences University of Kentucky

 

 

Rich Donohue: "Finding the Plus in New Maps Plus"

Mrach 25, 2016 - 3:30pm 234 Classroom Building Rich Donohue, Postdoctoral Researcher in the Department of Geography at the University of Kentucky

Love is...

The 22nd annual Conference on Critical Geography was hosted at the University of Kentucky this past October. In between sessions, conference participants had the opportunity to participate in a video booth project, titled Love Is.... Here, participants were asked to share their thoughts and opinions on the nature of love.

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