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The State of Education: A Conversation about Public Schooling, Critical Race Theory, and Political Polarization

 

Over the past year, the teaching of “critical race theory” in public schools has become a hot-button political issue, dividing parents, teachers, and school board officials alike, sparking a national conversation about who should determine the content of public-school curriculum, and leading to the introduction of legislation that would limit what could be taught in Kentucky classrooms. The Cooperative for the Humanities and Social Sciences is bringing together scholars and community members to discuss critical social problems, in this case the influence of political polarization on public school curriculum. We will discuss what exactly critical race theory is, seek to understand why legislation affecting school curriculum is being introduced in Kentucky, and explore what its impact might be. Our panelists include: Nikki Brown, UK Professor of History and African American and Africana Studies; Arnold Farr, UK Professor of Philosophy and Fayette-Urban County Council-at-Large Candidate; Tyler Murphy, Chair of the Fayette County Board of Education and a National Board-Certified Social Studies Teacher at Boyle County High School; Pragya Upreti, a Senior at Lafayette High School and the research lead for the Kentucky Student Voice Team, an independent youth-led organization focusing on education research, policy, and advocacy; Steve Voss, UK Professor of Political Science; and Lucy Waterbury, a Fayette County Public School Parent, School Based Decision Making Council Parent Representative, PTSA Leader, and co-founder of Save Our Schools Kentucky.

 

Zoom Recording:

https://uky.zoom.us/rec/share/byUgIwTqswWUAez8GWahqCGsp_wv6boeKWPMCnLiiZ5VdjENrawbgJTHx7xlmGoi.ftX49F4uUFGxxshp

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via Zoom link below
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Conversation on Public Schooling, Critical Race Theory and Political Polarization

 

 
   

 

 

Public Schooling, Critical Race Theory, Political Polarization

Over the past year, the teaching of “critical race theory” in public schools has become a hot-button political issue, dividing parents, teachers, and school board officials alike,  sparking a national conversation about who should determine the content of public-school curriculum, and leading to the introduction of legislation that would limit what could be taught in Kentucky classrooms . The Cooperative for the Humanities and Social Sciences seeks to bring together scholars and community members to discuss critical social problems, in this case the influence of political polarization on public school curriculum.  We will discuss what exactly critical race theory is,  seek to understand why legislation affecting school curriculum is being introduced in Kentucky, and explore what its impact might be. Our panelists include: Nikki Brown, UK Professor of History and African American and Africana Studies; Arnold Farr, UK Professor of Philosophy and Fayette-Urban County Council-at-Large Candidate; Tyler Murphy, Chair of the Fayette County Board of Education and a National Board-Certified Social Studies Teacher at Boyle County High School; Pragya Upreti, a Senior at Lafayette High School and the research lead for the Kentucky Student Voice Team, an independent youth-led organization focusing on education research, policy, and advocacy; Steve Voss, UK Professor of Political Science; and Lucy Waterbury, a Fayette County Public School Parent, School Based Decision Making Council Parent Representative, PTSA Leader, and co-founder of Save Our Schools Kentucky.

 

Register here: https://uky.zoom.us/j/85145431963?pwd=di9sVlQ5bkE4SnFjNnNCaERjSndzdz09

 

 

 

 

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via Zoom link below
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Atrocities in Civil War: A Talk by Andrew Kydd dsvoss Thu, 11/15/2018 - 03:17 pm

UK's Peace Studies Program is bringing to campus Dr. Andrew H. Kydd, an expert on international security and strategic behavior, for an hour-long presentation with Q&A in W.T. Young Library Auditorium. Free and open to the public.

Date:
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Location:
W.T. Young Library Auditorium
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WilDCats at the Capitol

WilDCats at the Capitol is the University of Kentucky’s federal government internship program that offers any UK student the opportunity to intern, earn course credit, and gain experience at the highest levels of government while living in the nation’s capital. Internships provide a dynamic opportunity to gain real- world work experience and apply classroom learning in a fast-paced, professional environment. Students spend 40 hours per week interning in the public agencies and private of ces on and off Capitol Hill.

Earn Credit as a Full-time Student- WilDCats at the Capitol is open to all majors. As a participant in this program, you will remain a full-time student earning 12 academic credit hours through your internship and classes taught by UK faculty in Washington, DC. By remaining a full-time student, you can use the scholarships and nancial aid you have earned and continue on a timely path to a degree.

Convenient Housing with UK Students- Participants in the program live together in a renovated historic town home in a safe district only steps from the US Capitol Building, the US Supreme Court, and the Library of Congress. Each town home is fully furnished; includes cable, utilities, laundry facilities, and internet; and is easily accessible to the DC Metro system.

Competitive Program Costs- Interns pay the same UK tuition and fee rates while living in the nation’s capital, but because WilDCats at the Capitol interns remain full-time students they can utilize their nancial aid and scholarships. Program housing costs include a $200 refundable security deposit and rental fees ranging from $3,900 in the summer to $4,300 in the fall and spring semesters for double occupancy rooms, shared living space, and a full kitchen to share with your fellow UK students interning in Washington, DC.

Financial Aid- In addition to scholarships and nancial aid that you have already earned, applicants are encouraged to apply for additional support offered by the Office of the President, Department of Political Science, and the UK Student Government Association. Last year, the WilDCats at the Capitol program awarded more than $15,000 in scholarships to participants. For more information about the program and details about the application process, please visit: www.uky.edu/president/internships/wildcats-capitol

Date:
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Location:
229 Gatton College of Business
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WilDCats at the Capitol

WilDCats at the Capitol is the University of Kentucky’s federal government internship program that offers any UK student the opportunity to intern, earn course credit, and gain experience at the highest levels of government while living in the nation’s capital. Internships provide a dynamic opportunity to gain real-world work experience and apply classroom learning in a fast-paced, professional environment. Students spend 40 hours per week interning in the public agencies and private offices on and off Capitol Hill.

Earn credit as a Full-time Student- WilDCats at the Capitol is open to all majors. As a participant in this program, you will remain a full-time student earning 12 academic credit hours through your internship and classes taught by UK faculty in Washington, DC. By remaining a full-time student, you can use the scholarships and financial aid you have earned and continue on a timely path to a degree.

Convenient Housing with UK Students- Participants in the program live together in a renovated historic town home in a safe district only steps from the US Capitol Building, the US Supreme Court, and the Library of Congress. Each town home is fully furnished; includes cable, utilities, laundry facilities, and internet; and is easily accessible to the DC Metro system.

Competitive Program Costs Interns pay the same UK tuition and fee rates while living in the nation’s capital, but because WilDCats at the Capitol interns remain full-time students they can utilize their nancial aid and scholarships. Program housing costs include a $200 refundable security deposit and rental fees ranging from $3,900 in the summer to $4,300 in the fall and spring semesters for double occupancy rooms, shared living space, and a full kitchen to share with your fellow UK students interning in Washington, DC.

Financial Aid In addition to scholarships and nancial aid that you have already earned, applicants are encouraged to apply for additional support offered by the Office of the President, Department of Political Science, and the UK Student Government Association. Last year, the WilDCats at the Capitol program awarded more than $15,000 in scholarships to participants. For more information about the program and details about the application process, please visit: www.uky.edu/president/internships/wildcats-capitol

Date:
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Location:
330AB Gatton Student Center

Social Conflict & Democracy: The Enduring Impact of Race on U.S. Politics

Part of the Political Science department's series on Social Conflict and Democracy, this panel focuses on the enduring impact that race and slavery hold over U.S. politics.  Featuring guest speaker Maya Sen of Harvard, presenting on "The Political Legacy of Southern Slavery," the panel include three Univ. of Kentucky faculty experts as well: Christia Spears Brown (Psychology), Melynda Price (UK Law), and Ray Block (AAAS & Political Science).

Cosponsored by the Quantitative Initiative for Social & Policy Research (QIPSR) and the College of Arts & Science's Keys to Our Common Future initiative.

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Location:
Kincaid Auditorium (#111 Gatton B&E)
Democracy, Citizenship and Violence in Latin America srhuts2 Wed, 08/23/2017 - 08:32 am

Date:
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Location:
Young Library Auditorium
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