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Appalachian Center Events

Readings and Inspiration

Please Join UK College of Arts & Sciences for an evening of Readings and Inspiration with Willie Edward Taylor Carver Jr. Poet, Educator, Activist, UK Academic Advisor, and author of the critically acclaimed new book Gay Poems for Red States

Reception and book signing to follow from 6-7 pm in the Alumni Gallery

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Location:
W.T. Library, UKAA Auditorium. 401 Hilltop Ave
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The Pandemic and the Professor: COVID-19’s Challenges for Teaching and Learning, and the Lasting Implications for Higher Education

As a prelude to the Fall Semester, Associate Provost Kathi Kern and Dean Mark Kornbluh will discuss the challenges posed by teaching and learning during the COVID-19 pandemic. Faculty and students alike worry about the logistics. How will we maintain a safe and healthy learning environment? How much of instruction will need to be moved online or “flipped”? How does technology enable or restrict us? How do we continue to foster strong student-teacher bonds at a distance? How do we build community in our current environment?

And while these questions are urgent for the particular moment, they also point to a lasting shift in how we go about our work as educators. Even after the pandemic subsides, we will likely find ourselves reflecting on the unexamined, yet sacred elements of what makes a college education. As disruptive as the pandemic has been, it has also ignited a climate of innovation. We are led to think anew about the journeys that our students take, how our research and disciplines best serve a diverse community of learners, how the wicked problems of the world defy institutional silos, and how we can best support individuals while also strengthening communities. Our lessons learned and enduring challenges from the past few months afford us a unique opportunity to anticipate these emergent paradigms for teaching and learning.

Pandemic and the Professor from UK College of Arts & Sciences on Vimeo.

 

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Online - Registration Required

Compressed Course: "Mapping Variation: An Introduction to the Use of Geospatial Tools for Linguistic Analysis" (A&S 500-003)

This one-week, one-credit compressed course focuses on mapping variation through the use of geospatial tools like GIS.  The course, offered as A&S 500-003, will take place from November 9-13 from 5-8pm each day in the Oliver Raymond Building, room C226.  As a 500-level course, it is open to both graduate and undergraduate students.

Dr. Montgomery's research investigates ways of integrating techniques used in geography with those traditionally used in dialectology.  His specific focus in the use of GIS technologies is innovative in the field of linguistics, and his presence on UK's campus will expose the community here to some of the most recent endeavors in these kinds of digital humanities research methodologies.  Despite a focus in linguistic variation, this class will present methods that could be applied to many of the social sciences and humanities, wherein the questions deal with societal patterns, variations in those patterns, and the geospatial presentation and analysis of data related to those patterns.  If you have any questions about this course, please contact Dr. Jennifer Cramer (jennifer.cramer@uky.edu).

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Location:
Oliver H Raymond Building, Room C226
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***EVENT CANCELLED DUE TO WEATHER***6th Annual Appalachian Research Community Symposium and Arts Showcase

***THIS EVENT IS CANCELLED DUE TO DANGEROUS WEATHER CONDITIONS. WE WILL RESCHEDULE AND POST UPDATES WHEN PLANS ARE FINALIZED*** The University of Kentucky Graduate Appalachian Research Community presents the 6th Annual UK Appalachian Research Community Symposium and Arts Showcase on Saturday, March 7, 2015 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the William T. Young Library.  This year's keynote speaker is Lisa Conley, Ph.D. Her research interests focus on foodways, environmental sustainability, and local food politics in motivating the self-provisioning practices of people in rural and urban Kentucky.  Please, find more information about registration or proposal submition here: https://appalachiancenter.as.uky.edu/annual-research-symposium.  The deadline to submit abstracts is February 15, 2015.  Registration for presenters and non-presenters is free.  Undergraduate and Graduate students are welcome to register.

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Location:
William T. Young Library
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"Perverse Subjects: Becoming Bodies of Literature in the Library"

The second in the “Works in Progress Series” features Melissa Adler, Assistant Professor in the School of Library and Information Science. She will be discussing the introduction to her book manuscript, tentatively titled Perverse Subjects: Becoming Bodies of Literature in the Library. The book provides an account of the ways in which the Library Congress classification standards that organize research libraries in the U.S. and abroad have reproduced normative ideas about sexuality since the beginning of the 20th century. The project challenges these classifications through the lens of perversion, echoing Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick’s call to become “perverse readers.”

Carol Mason (GWS) and Rusty Barrett (Linguistics) will serve as respondents. Attendees should email CST Director Dr. Marion Rust (marion.rust@uky.edu) for a copy of Dr. Adler’s paper.

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Location:
Bingham-Davis House, Gaines Center
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Long Time Ago... A Performance by Crit Callebs Eastern Band Cherokee Storyteller

 
Crit Callebs (Eastern Band Cherokee descendant) is a traditional hunter, food gatherer, and fire-tender and lives on the Yakama Nation Indian Reservation. He is completing his Master’s Degree at Central Washington University (CWU) in Cultural Resource Management with an expertise in treaty rights concerning Indian hunting and fishing. He served as the Native American Liaison at the Center for Diversity and Social Justice and was a very popular guest lecturer for the American Indian Studies program. Crit is a trainer for the “Since Time Immemorial” tribal sovereignty and history curriculum implemented in K-12 classrooms in Washington State. As an active member of the Northwest Indian Storytelling Association he has been a featured storyteller for the Tseil-Waututh Nation, CWU Museum of Culture and Environment, Colville Tribes Youth “Warrior Camp” and is the 2014 Alaska Spirit of Reading storyteller. Crit is also a professional survival trainer and former instructor for the world renowned Boulder Outdoors Survival School. One of his great passions is teaching youth and adults how to be self-reliant in the wilderness. Using his gift of storytelling, he travels throughout the U.S. and Canada sharing traditional stories, teaching cultural camps and conducting workshops that promote self-awareness, ancestral skills, and Indigenous values.
 
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Location:
The Niles Gallery -- Lucille Fine Arts Library
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National Conference on Undergraduate Research

The National Conference on Undergraduate Research is an annual student conference dedicated to promoting undergraduate research, scholarship, and creative activity in all fields of study. Unlike meetings of academic professional organizations, this gathering of young scholars welcomes presenters from institutions of higher learning from all corners of the academic curriculum. This annual conference creates a unique environment for the celebration and promotion of undergraduate student achievement, provides models of exemplary research and scholarship, and helps to improve the state of undergraduate education.

Learn more here.

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Location:
UK Campus
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