News

4/24/2019

By Jenny Wells

Suzanne C. Segerstrom, a professor in the University of Kentucky Department of Psychology, is serving as the 2018-19 UK College of Arts and Sciences' Distinguished Professor and will present the annual Distinguished Professor Lecture this week.

Her talk, "Well-being, Immunological Aging, and the Brain," will explore how psychological well-being influences the immune system. The lecture will begin 7 p.m. Thursday, April 25, in the UK Athletics Auditorium in the William T. Young Library.

In 2017, Segerstrom and her team of researchers received a $3.3 million grant from the National Institute on Aging to continue the “Thought, Stress, and Immunity” study, which has been investigating the interactions between psychological and immunological

4/22/2019

Psychology/Neuroscience Professors Mark Fillmore and Mark Prendergast received a 5-year,  $1.7 million grant from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism to train the next generation of scientists who study alcohol. These funds will support 5 outstanding graduate students conducting basic or applied alcohol research from across UK's campus. Each student will be supported for a period of 2 years. This funding, from an arm of the National Institutes of Health, is tax payer funded. At UK, we have the ability to study alcohol use, its risk factors and consequences at many levels of analysis and to integrate those findings in a collaborative manner to address our shared goals of better understanding risk factors for alcohol abuse, consequences of alcohol abuse and potential treatments of alcohol abuse.


 

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4/19/2019

By Lindsey Piercy

(Left to right) Suzanne Segerstrom and Brett Spear

Two University of Kentucky faculty members were honored for their outstanding contributions to research, mentoring and scholarship at the 2019 University of Kentucky Awards ceremony held April 18.

Suzanne Segerstrom, professor in the Department of Psychology, was presented the 2019 Albert D. and Elizabeth H. Kirwan Memorial Prize, given each year to a faculty member in recognition of outstanding contributions to original research or scholarship, with an emphasis on work produced four years prior to the award.

Brett Spear, professor in the Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular

4/17/2019

 

Lauren Miller, Class of 2006

Major: Psychology

Senior Leadership Recruiter at Tesla *

 

     

 

What was your childhood like?

I grew up in the Louisville area and went to Sacred Heart Academy. Go Valkyries!

I loved to play volleyball, tennis and swim. I’ve always loved interior design and art projects.

Growing up, we took a lot of trips in the conversion van, so I’ve actually been to 45 states! Today, my partner Anand and I try to travel as much as we can, but we usually choose a plane over the van :).

I was the kid wearing tie dye and reminding everyone to recycle, which is probably why I ended up at Tesla!

How did you wind up at UK? Why did you select Psychology as your major?

My dad went to UK and it was

4/17/2019

Catherine Seidelman (class of 2010), Will Seidelman (class of 2009), and Dexter

Will Seidelman, Class of 2009

Major: Psychology
Minor: Philosophy

Manager, User Research AmazonTransportation and Recipient Experience at Amazon *

 


I currently work for Amazon, but the opinions below are my own and do not necessarily represent Amazon’s position.   What was your childhood like?

We moved several times before ending up in the bluegrass state. I was interested in technology early in life and my parents fostered that desire. In high school, I played a KY state tournament basketball game in Rupp Arena, I do not think Coach Cal would have been particularly impressed with my performance that day.

How
4/3/2019

The autism-related research of UK alum and neuroscientist Dr. Blair Braden was featured recently on social media outlets of the Society for Neuroscience. Blair worked in the lab of Dr. Mark Prendergast many years ago, and attended graduate school at Arizona State University, where she is now a professor.

"Telomere twist: Blair Braden, assistant professor at Arizona State University, and colleagues reported work showing that children with autism have shorter telomeres than their typical peers. The effect is particularly strong in girls with autism. The findings add an interesting twist to the literature on sex differences in autism. More importantly, if shortened telomeres are a risk factor

2/27/2019

 

When Quiyana Murphy arrived on UK's campus as a freshman she found a home at the CARES Center. Watch why she is now the one helping others to feel at home by tutoring fellow Wildcats. Murphy graduated from UK with degrees in math and psychology, and is currently a post-bac student in the Department of Mathematics.

2/25/2019

By Lindsey Piercy

There's something immensely intriguing about true crime stories. You've probably fallen victim to binge watching various docuseries that feature fascinating tales of tragedies. Your latest obsession may have you wondering — why would someone torment people, especially those they don't even know?

By definition, a sadist is, "A person who derives pleasure from inflicting pain or humiliation on others." Instinctively, when one thinks of sadists, they think of serial killers. However, we all know sadists. According to David Chester, they are everywhere to varying degrees. In fact, sadists are commonly considered bullies.

"Sadistic tendencies are impulses that people have to experience pleasure from inflicting harm on others," he said. "These impulses exist in many people, not just violent criminals."

A new 

2/21/2019

By Ryan Girves

Eighteen University of Kentucky students are making their way to the State Capitol Building in Frankfort, Kentucky, to present their research at the 2019 Posters-at-the-Capitol event. This one-day annual event is held to show Kentucky legislators the importance of undergraduate research and scholarly work in Kentucky. The governor proclaims this day to be Undergraduate Research Day across the Commonwealth.

"Posters-at-the-Capitol is a platform whereby undergraduates from across the Commonwealth’s eight public institutions proudly showcase their undergraduate research projects," said Evie Russell, assistant director at the Office of Undergraduate Research. "Each year, University of Kentucky students look forward to communicating their research achievements to Kentucky Legislators and their peers."

The work presented by students

2/20/2019

By Lindsey Piercy

Christia Spears Brown's professional roles as a researcher, teacher and advocate for public policy issues are integrated around her interests in issues of diversity and equality. Pete Comparoni | UK Photo.

Martin Luther King Jr. once famously said, “injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.” Nearly 60 years later, his words are still a source of inspiration for those who seek justice — including Christia Spears Brown. As a professor in the Department of Psychology in the College of Arts & Sciences at the University of Kentucky, she strives to help society understand we are all connected, and spreading that message starts with educating the younger generation.

"I'm passionate about ensuring that all children, regardless of the social

1/8/2019

By Carl Nathe

 

If you need an example of how a broad-based college education can open up your mind to new challenges and opportunities, look no farther than University of Kentucky College of Arts and Sciences Professor of PsychologySuzanne Segerstrom.

Segerstrom majored in music as an undergraduate and initially thought she would make a career in the field. She took an elective course in psychology and enjoyed it so much she took another, then another. Her curiosity developed into a passion and she decided to go to graduate school and focus on psychology. The rest, as they say, is history.

On this week’s episode of “Behind the Blue,” UK Marketing and Strategic Communications' Carl Nathe talks with Segerstrom about

12/7/2018

By Lindsey Piercy

'Tis the season to be merry and bright! But you may be feeling less than joyful during the "most wonderful time of the year." Do you experience stress, anxiety or even depression from November to January? If so, you're not alone.

"It's pretty common. In my clinical and personal experience, I would say most, but not all, people report increased stress around the holidays. However, only a subset of vulnerable people experiences clinical problems, such as depression and anxiety, around these times," Michelle Martel, associate professor in the Department of Psychology, said. 

From impeccable wreaths to the tree surrounded by a mountain of gifts — creating the "perfect" holiday can add to existing stressors. "Including financial strain (from

12/4/2018
Who? Children in 3rd-5th grades What? Learning social skills and coping skills for strong emotions. Examples include problem-solving skills, cool-down skills, and learning how to take the perspectives of others.  When and How Long? 6-week course; 4:30-6PM on a Tuesday or Thursday; Every fall & spring semester; See flyer below for spring 2019 dates  Where? The Harris Psychological Services Center    We have run this class for the past three semesters at the Harris Center, and demand is growing. The class caps at 10, and the class has been filled nearly ever round, resulting in two groups being run at the same time in several instances!    It’s not just teaching that draws the kids. Our classes are filled with fun activities that reinforce the concepts kids are learning, such as skits
12/3/2018
Meet Alyssa Jones, a 4th year graduate student in the doctoral clinical psychology program at the University of Kentucky. Alyssa is the assistant director at the Harris Center who hopes to pursue a career that involves research, potentially within an academic medical center or with the VA. She is also interested in mental health advocacy and hopes to incorporate public policy into her career.   Alyssa’s research interests are related to better understanding the emotional impact of trauma, individual differences in emotional experience and emotion regulation, the assessment of emotion and the development and treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder. Alyssa said her dissertation will compare two methods of reducing trauma-related shame among women who have experienced interpersonal violence. “I am grateful to be working with Dr. Christal Badour; my skills as a researcher have
12/3/2018
January: 21-25- No Name Calling Week 22-27- National Drug and Alcohol Facts Week
February: 17-23- Random Acts of Kindness Week 26-March 4- National Eating Disorders Awareness Week

 

March February 26- 4- National Eating Disorders Awareness Week  01- Self-Injury Awareness Day 31- Transgender Day of Visibility 

 

April  02- Sexual Assult Awareness Day 04- National Alcohol Screening Day 07- World Health Day 08-12- National Youth Violence Prevention Week

 

11/3/2018

Neuroscientists from the Department of Psychology in the College of Arts and Sciences and the Department of Behavioral Science in the College of Medicine have received an award from the National Institutes of Health to study cocaine use disorder from a new perspective.

Cocaine use disorder (CUD) is marked by the repeated decision to pursue and use cocaine over other available activities and goods. However, lab-based studies to date have not systematically investigated the decision-making processes that underlie the choice to use cocaine. The present translational, multidisciplinary project melds modern mathematical modeling techniques with state-of-the-art neuroscience methods to investigate the neurobehavioral processes that underlie cocaine-associated decision-making in real time. This innovative approach enables the simultaneous quantitative characterization of cocaine-

7/30/2018

By Whitney Hale and Jenny Wells

 

More than 45 of the University of Kentucky's students and recent graduates had the world's most prestigious scholarship, fellowship and internship organizations take note this year. The newest class of highly regarded scholars include UK’s 14th Truman Scholar and first Pickering Fellow.

Helping prepare these UK students and recent alumni to compete for and win such honors is the mission of the UK Office of Nationally Competitive Awards. Under the guidance and leadership of Pat Whitlow, the office identifies and works with young scholars on the application process for large scholastic prizes awarded by regional, national and international sources.

This year UK students and alumni were recognized with the following awards:

5/29/2018

By Lindsey Piercy

From Facebook and Twitter, to Instagram and Snapchat, it's no secret social media has become a common form of communication, but have you ever left your feeds feeling bad about yourself? If so, you’re not alone, according to a new study conducted by Ilyssa Salomon, doctoral student, and Christia Spears Brown, professor of psychology, at the University of Kentucky in the College of Arts & Sciences.

Social media presents a unique set of challenges for those who are feeling vulnerable. Teenagers are the first generation that cannot imagine life without the internet. Some of that interaction can be positive, allowing teens to find a sense of belonging, but less known is the negative impact of social media on body image.

"If you walk by any group of teenagers, you will notice that most of

5/24/2018

By Lindsey PIercy

Rachel Farr, assistant professor of developmental psychology in the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of Kentucky, has been selected as a recipient of the 2018 William T. Grant Scholars Award.

Launched in 1982, the scholars program supports the professional development of promising researchers in the social, behavioral and health sciences. To date, the program has sponsored more than 180 talented researchers.

Scholars receive $350,000 to execute rigorous five-year research plans that stretch their skills and knowledge into new disciplines. As they commence their projects, they build mentoring relationships with experts in areas pertinent to their development.

4/27/2018

By Hiyabel Ghirmay

Suzanne Segerstrompsychology professor in the University of Kentucky College of Arts and Sciences, is known for her clinical research on optimism and other personality traits in relation to health. Recognized as one of the prominent scientists in the discipline, Segerstrom recently joined an elite group in her field as a newly elected fellow of the Association for Psychological Science (APS).

“This is a significant honor, and one that is well earned,” said Mark Kornbluh, dean of the college. “I am proud to have Suzanne as part of our faculty. The Department of Psychology, the College of Arts and Sciences, and the University of Kentucky all benefit from her excellent work.”

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