News

5/1/2013
The New Dormitory, the second building added to the institution's original three buildings, was constructed in 1890 at a cost of $14,500. Photo courtesy of UK Special Collections.

By Whitney Hale

In celebration of the University of Kentucky's upcoming sesquicentennial in 2015, the 55th of 150 weekly installments remembers Neville Hall, the fifth building constructed at the institution.

The New Dormitory, the second building added to the institution's original three buildings, was constructed in 1890 at a cost of $14,500. It was remodeled for classes in 1918 due to a report in June of 1917 that described the New Dormitory and the Old Dormitory as "public nuisances."

On Dec. 18, 1919, the Board of Trustees, following the recommendation of President Frank L. McVey, renamed the building known as the New Dormitory Neville Hall in honor of

4/24/2013
UK students Anil Erol, Holly Poore and Heidi Vollrath will conduct research that takes them across the globe this summer.

By Sarah Geegan, Seth Riker

UK students Anil Erol, Holly Poore and Heidi Vollrath will conduct research that takes them across the globe this summer.

Education Abroad at UK (EA) and the Office of Undergraduate Research (UGR) awarded the three UK students with an Undergraduate Research Abroad Scholarship (UGRAS) to support their international independent research projects during the summer session. The scholarships are the result of a new collaboration between EA and UGR to support experienced undergraduate researchers as they explore their academic interests abroad ­– with the support of their UK faculty mentors. 

“Research has no boundaries,”

4/1/2013
The University of Kentucky Gaines Center for the Humanities has chosen 12 outstanding undergraduates as new scholars for the university's Gaines Fellowship Program for the 2013-14 and 2014-15 academic years.

By Whitney Hale, Breanna Shelton

The University of Kentucky Gaines Center for the Humanities has chosen 12 outstanding undergraduates as new scholars for the university's Gaines Fellowship Program for the 2013-14 and 2014-15 academic years. Gaines Fellowships are given in recognition of outstanding academic performance, demonstrated ability to conduct independent research, an interest in public issues and a desire to enhance understanding of the human condition through the humanities.

Gaines Fellowships are awarded for the tenure of a student's junior and senior years, or for the last two years of a five-year program; students in all disciplines and with any intended profession are given equal consideration.

UK's 12

3/18/2013
Charles Black has taken his education at the University of Kentucky to New York: on stages and TV shows.

Video by UK Public Relations and Marketing

Article by Kelley Bozeman, Jay Blanton, Amy Jones, Kody Kiser

The best learning — and the most profound educational experiences — often take place outside the traditional classroom.

For Charles Black, such experiences have guided him as he has taken his education at the University of Kentucky to frequent appearances on New York stages and TV shows.

As a student, Black said, he traveled with theatre department professors and fellow students to New York.

“It was my very first trip to New York, where I learned that I really wanted to move here," Black said. "It all came from being at the University of Kentucky."

During the trip, Black and his fellow students got a behind-the-scenes look at life in the theater on the biggest of

3/13/2013
students

 

by Sarah Geegan

Students in the University of Kentucky Honors Program had the opportunity to demonstrate their dexterity last month at the bi-annual Kentucky Honors Roundtable (KHR), hosted at UK.

A conference held each spring, KHR rotates among public universities in the Commonwealth and allows undergraduate students to present their research projects, serve on academic panels and interact with academically excelling students from other Kentucky institutions. This year the conference hosted approximately 60 presentations, spanning over a range of diverse topics.

The conference will serve as wonderful practice for UK honors students as many of them prepare for more large-scale conferences, such as National Conference on Undergraduate

2/12/2013

 

By Sarah Geegan

The science may be new, but the program itself is in its second year, after tremendous success in 2011-2012. The College of Arts and Sciences' "What's New in Science" series, an outreach program aimed to strengthen UK's relationships with high school science programs, will once again engage teachers and youth in various scientific areas.

A succession of UK scientists will discuss emerging discoveries and exciting developments occurring now in the realm of science. Held in a casual round table format, professors from various disciplines and science teachers from Kentucky schools talk among themselves at these events, asking questions and discussing answers about new and emerging scientific knowledge.

Each session focuses on a new topic in one of the

2/11/2013
Michael Bardo, University of Kentucky Psychology professor and director of the Center on Drug Abuse Research Translation, was the guest on Saturday's "UK at the Half."

By Kathy Johnson

Michael Bardo, University of Kentucky Psychology professor and director of the Center on Drug Abuse Research Translation, was the guest on Saturday's "UK at the Half," which aired during the UK vs. Auburn game that was broadcast on radio.

"UK at the Half" airs during halftime of each UK football and basketball game broadcast on radio and is hosted by Carl Nathe of UK Public Relations and Marketing.

To hear the "UK at the Half" interview, click here. View a transcript of the interview,

1/15/2013
Dr Leslie Crofford

The following column appeared in the Lexington Herald-Leader on Sunday, Jan. 13, 2013.

by Dr. Leslie Crofford

Everyday aches and pains are a part of life, but sometimes they can get so severe that it is almost unbearable and interferes with the ability to function normally. In that case, fibromyalgia may be to blame.

Fibromyalgia causes pain that can be felt in muscles, joint and even skin. Although it is the most common musculoskeletal condition after osteoarthritis, it is often misunderstood and misdiagnosed. It is characterized by all-over body ache that persists for at least three months, specific tender points on the body and severe fatigue. 

The muscles may feel like they are tired and overworked and may twitch, burn or have a deep stabbing pain. The condition can be accompanied by

1/3/2013

 

By Sarah Geegan   The University of Kentucky Center for Drug Abuse Research Translation (CDART) has received a $7 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), funding which will continue the center's long history of developing novel intervention strategies that target high-risk individuals.   CDART is connected to the Division of Epidemiology, Services and Prevention Research at the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA). Though they are separate entities, CDART and NIDA have the common mission of understanding the causes and prevention of
12/7/2012

by Jenny Wells & Danica Kubly

The University of Kentucky Office for Undergraduate Research recognized and awarded 19 students this week with the Oswald Research and Creativity Program awards.  Diane Snow, director of the Office of Undergraduate Research, and Ben Withers, interim associate provost for Undergraduate Education, were on hand to congratulate the winners and distribute the awards. 

Established in 1964 by then-UK President John Oswald, the Oswald Research and Creativity Program encourages research and creative activities by undergraduate students at UK. The objectives of the program are to stimulate creative work by undergraduate students, and to

11/26/2012

by Sarah Geegan & Tess Perica

Three University of Kentucky sociologists have co-authored a study that helps to fill a gap in our understanding of suicide risk among African-American women.

Appearing in the December issue of Social Psychology Quarterly (SPQ), the study, “Too Much of a Good Thing? Psychosocial Resources, Gendered Racism, and Suicidal Ideation among Low Socioeconomic Status African American Women,” examines the relationship between racial and gender discrimination and suicidal ideation, or thinking about and desiring to commit suicide. The co-authors on the study include Assistant Professor Brea L. Perry, Associate Professor Carrie B. Oser, and Ph.D. candidate

10/3/2012

​by Sarah Geegan and Sarah Hutcheon Mancoll

A new study by researchers at the University of Kentucky found that teachers and schools that value diversity have a big impact on the academic experiences of Latino immigrant children living in predominantly White communities. The study appears in a special section of the September/October 2012 issue of Child Development on children from immigrant families.

The researchers discovered that children who had a teacher who valued diversity felt more positively about their ethnicity than children who had a teacher who felt uncomfortable with diversity.

“This is important because feeling positively about their ethnicity was associated with children valuing school more, enjoying school more, feeling like they belonged at school more and getting better grades,” said 

9/26/2012

by Allison Elliot

 

A study by a team of University of Kentucky researchers has shed new light on the potential habit-forming properties of the popular pain medication tramadol, in research funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse.  The paper is slated to appear in an upcoming edition of the academic journal Psychopharmacology.

Prescription pain killer abuse is a major public health problem in the U.S. In 2010, more individuals over the age of 12 reported nonmedical use of prescription pain relievers in the past month than use of cocaine, methamphetamine or heroin.

"Prescription pain pill abuse is a real problem in Kentucky. We have lots of overdoses. We held a summit here in February

9/10/2012

by Whitney Hale

Last spring, Teach for America selected 27 recent graduates of the University of Kentucky to serve in America's inner cities and rural communities. The UK group, the largest in school history, is among 5,800 new corps members selected for Teach for America, a national program in which outstanding college graduates commit to teach for two years in disadvantaged urban and rural public schools.

Teach for America places its recruits in the nation's highest-need elementary and secondary schools in many of the country's lowest income communities, both rural and urban, in an effort to close the achievement gap between economically advantaged and disadvantaged children.

This year’s corps is the largest in Teach for America’s history.

7/16/2012
golding

 

By Sarah Geegan

Jonathan Golding, professor in the Department of Psychology in the UK College of Arts and Sciences, was recently featured in Inside Higher Education describing his integration of Facebook into his courses.

"When the idea of using social media (e.g., Facebook) as part of my face-to-face classes was suggested to me about two years ago, I found myself in the slow lane," Golding said. "Luckily, about a year ago I saw the proverbial light."

After all the years of teaching “mega-sections,” introductory courses with more than 500 students, Golding sought a way to create more meaningful interpersonal communication with students, as well as more

6/1/2012

 

By Sarah Geegan

Psychology Associate Professor Nathan DeWall will showcase his expertise on the Discovery Channel's new series "Head Games," premiering at 10 p.m. this Sunday, June 3.

The show, narrated by actor John Krasinski, invites viewers to explore brain games, mind puzzles and social experiments that display how the human mind works. Both viewers and on-screen subjects will be challenged to participate in these puzzles to better understand how and why people conform, perceive, react in certain ways or make moral judgments — all relating to the complex inner workings of the brain.

DeWall will appear in the "Conformity

5/17/2012

By Sarah Geegan

Visionaries often ask us to look skyward for signs of alien intelligence. A new book, "The Oxford Handbook of Comparative Cognition," edited by Thomas Zentall of the University of Kentucky Department of Psychology and Edward Wasserman of the University of Iowa, suggests that we might more fruitfully explore and understand alien intelligence right here on Earth.

This 960-page volume, published in February by Oxford University Press, is a compendium of scientific research into the cognitive worlds of animals, a flourishing field of study that that was prompted by Charles Darwin’s provocative proposal that humans and animals

4/26/2012
whats new in science logo

 

By Sarah Geegan

In February and March, area high school teachers gathered at the University of Kentucky to learn about recent scientific discoveries in various fields. On Thursday, April 26, the College of Arts & Sciences will offer a psychological perspective on "What's New in Science."

Psychology Professor Susan Barron will lead the fourth lecture in the What's New in Science series, an outreach program aimed to strengthen UK's relationships with high school science programs. The lecture will take place in the Davis Marksbury Building at 7 p.m.

The series engages teachers and youth in various scientific

4/25/2012
whats new in science logo

By Sarah Geegan

The University of Kentucky BiologyPhysics and AstronomyChemistry, and Psychology departments are reaching out to area high school science teachers and teaching them something new: what's new in science.

The What's New in Science series, an outreach program aimed to strengthen UK's relationships with high school science programs, will engage teachers and youth in various scientific areas. It will focus specifically on emerging discoveries and developments in the realm of science.

"The university already has a strong history in supporting science teachers in Kentucky Schools," said Sally

4/24/2012

The College of Arts & Sciences is pleased to announce that the recipients of the 2012-13 A&S Outstanding Teaching Awards are Drs. Christia Brown (psychology), Brenna Byrd (MCLLC), Yanira Paz (Hispanic Studies), and Bradley Plaster (physics & astronomy).

Dr. Christia Brown has been in the psychology department since 2007 and is affiliated with the Children at Risk Research Cluster, Gender and Women’s Studies, and the UK Center for Poverty Research.  She exemplifies teaching excellence.  She creates an innovative learning environment in every classroom she enters, whether through engagement activities in her large lecture courses or debates in her smaller seminars. One of her students stated, “This is the best class and professor I have ever had at UK.”  Outside the classroom she is a

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